Vaccinating kids against HPV could protect them from cancer as an adult

Daybreak

The vaccine is meant to protect them from a lifetime infection, and it's safe and effective

(WYTV) – There is something parents can do to prevent cancer in their children, protecting them from something they might have to deal with in the future.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention urges parents to have their children vaccinated against human papillomavirus (HPV).

It’s meant to protect them from a lifetime infection, and it’s safe and effective.

“You can start as young as 9 years old,” said Dr. Gregory Poland, with the Vaccine Research Group at the Mayo Clinic. “The typical time to give it is as you’re entering into adolescence, in that 11-, 12-year-old timeframe.”

HPV can cause an infection that usually clears up on its own, but could cause warts, or oral or cervical cancer.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends two doses of the HPV vaccine for 11- and 12-year-old boys and girls before they become sexually active, which is how HPV spreads.

Some parents are reluctant to have their children vaccinated because they feel it could lead to sexual activity. That’s a discussion to have with your doctor and pastor or another spiritual advisor.

Copyright 2021 Nexstar Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

Trending on WYTV.com