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Nugget of Knowledge: The origin of the hamburger

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The origin of the hamburger may actually go back to the Romans in the first century A.D.

(WYTV) – The origin of the hamburger may actually go back to the Romans in the first century A.D. where they ate something that looked like a hamburger with flavors including ground or minced meat with pepper, wine flavorings and nuts.

In the 13th century, Mongol horsemen rode across Asia with raw meat stashed beneath their saddles, so the meat got pounded, tenderizing it into a patty for cooking later.

A 1747 English cookbook mentions smoked beef in a patty. Then, it gets a name: hamburg steak.

Hamburg is the second-largest city in Germany, and back in the 19th century, Germans emigrated to America on the Hamburg America line and brought with them the “Hamburg” steak, consisting of minced, salted beefsteak.

Forward to 1873, when a steak house in New York City called Delmonico’s opened and displayed the “Hamburg” steak on its menu for a steep price of ten cents.

Then in 1885, at a fair in Hamburg, New York, brothers Frank and Charles Menches ran low on pork and decided to use beef in their sandwich instead.

That same year, teenager Charlie Nagreen had a similar idea in Seymour, Wiconcin, and offered a Hamburg slice.

In 1904, the hamburger gained national recognition at the St. Louis World’s Fair.

The world’s first burger chain, White Castle, opened in 1921.

The humble hamburger has traveled around the world to get to where it is today.

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