Len Rome’s Local Health: Resolving partner conflicts

Daybreak

Once once couples start getting hostile or detached, it creates real problems and people have a hard time finding their way back

(WYTV) –  So, are you still happy, all lovey dovey, cooped up with your partner with the virus outside? Still getting along?

Okay, maybe not so much. Maybe you’re arguing, then making up, then arguing again. Here’s what not to do.

“Things like criticism, defensiveness, contempt, or stone-walling, which is a refusal to engage in problem-solving. If you notice those are growing in your relationship, you do want to take some steps if you value that relationship and if you value being happy instead of being right, sometimes we have to humble ourselves and say there’s some things I can learn, and some things I can modify,” said Psychologist Dr. Scott Bea.

Once once couples start getting hostile or detached, it creates real problems and people have a hard time finding their way back.

Problem solving isn’t something we typically rehearse, but an active approach always seems better than something passive.

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